A funny, totally NSFW rant about what NOT to do on LinkedIn

I’m a big believer in the power of personalized connection requests. As I’ve said in a previous post:

[I]t’s important to personalize the connection request so the other party has a sense of how they know you or why they may want to connect with you. By relying on the default script, you’re assuming the person will accept your connection request out of good faith or will take the time to understand who you are or how you’re connected. As social media consumes more of our time, however, that’s not likely to happen.

I know I’m not alone in this, because countless LinkedIn users have told me about receiving connection requests from people they don’t know and that make no attempt to explain why the request should be accepted. Some have even been pretty upset about it.

Erika Napoletano by Darren Mahuron at Summit Studios

Erika Napoletano by Darren Mahuron at Summit Studios

Well, even the most strongly-worded rant on this topic would seem modest compared to something I read last week from Erika Napoletano. (If you’re easily offended by the swearing and/or the cussing, now would be a good time to click on something else. Still here? Great. Let’s continue.) Entitled “The Bitch Slap: Stop Being a Jackass With Your LinkedIn Requests,” the post begins as follows:

You need to learn how to use LinkedIn if you’re going to use it.

Every week, my “Invitations” inbox is jam packed with invitations to connect. Lovely. People like me. Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay.

But would you kindly explain to me who the fuck you are and why you’re jamming up not just one, but TWO of my inboxes with your requests? By the time I get that little notification in my real inbox that you’d “like to add me to your professional network on LinkedIn,” I now have two messages to delete instead of one.

And frankly, you’re wearing me out.

Things only accelerate from there. (Don’t say I didn’t warn you, gentle reader.)

Now it’s not the most delicately worded argument, I’ll grant you that. But like a lot of things, sometimes strong words get people’s attention much more readily than the same polite advice given over and over again. Furthermore, Napoletano is dead on in her comments–what she’s saying, that is, is pretty close to what some people think, even if it’s not what they say.

If you like Napoletano’s style, there’s more where that came from. If not, maybe you should buy one of these.

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